An Ethiopian smorgasboard

Discussion in 'Food and Cooking' started by 3boysnagrl, Oct 10, 2010.

  1. 3boysnagrl

    3boysnagrl Amity's Focus Member

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    So on Tuesday, Sarah (snugbug) is going to be here to visit for a few hours. I also have a potluck at my Bible Study that evening, so I decided I would just make a LOT of Ethiopian food.

    I have a sourdough starter on my counter and tomorrow night I will start the injera making process. Injera is a large round sourdough pancake-type bread. It uses teff flour, and it's not turned - so the top looks like a sponge, with lots of popped bubbles. This is my first attempt at making it more true - the other two times I made it I used a quick method, and it wasn't anything like the real stuff. Making a batch of injera is a 3 step process, and has to be started the day before the injera is cooked. So... tomorrow I will be starting that process with the sourdough starter I have on the counter.

    Yesterday I made some nitr kibeh, basically a spiced ghee. This is used in all the dishes I will be preparing.

    I will be also cooking up 2 meat dishes: doro wat and beef tibbs. The doro wat is a spicy chicken stew, using skinless thighs and legs. The beef tibbs is small bite sized pieces of beef cooked in the nitr kibeh, with onions.

    I'll be making cabbage/carrots/potatoes all seasoned with a turmeric spice blend. I'll also be preparing gomen - cooked collards/spinach with the nitr kibeh.

    Two more dishes will be made: misr wat and kik wat. Misr wat is a spicy (uses the same seasonings as the doro wat) lentil. Kik wat is a garlic/ginger/turmeric spiced yellow split pea dish.

    All of the dishes are served atop a piece of injera - and the injera soaks up the juices of each dish. Then you tear the injera and use it as a utensil to eat the dinner. I plan on serving the adults the traditional way, all off of the same platter. The kids - well... we'll probably do a buffet line for them and then send them out to the back yard to ear. :) The adults can sit around the table and chat and eat.

    I'll be taking whatever leftovers I have to my Bible Study.

    I hope others like it. :heart smirk:
  2. freedomlover

    freedomlover ReaderOfThreads

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    Yum.

    I am a big ethiopian cuisine fan.

    In my area, there are several restaurants.

    I don't think I have the skills to cook it! Good for you!!!!
  3. I would love to see photos of the food once you make it!
  4. Mrs. Mommy

    Mrs. Mommy Breathe

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    That sounds yummy! Will you post pics and/or recipes?
  5. golden

    golden Active Member

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    I've never had Ethiopian food. It all sounds yummy! I remember back in the days when I was a preschool teacher, there was a significant Ethiopian population in the city where I worked. I had three E children in my class. They always came in smelling so good! Their coats, etc.
  6. 3boysnagrl

    3boysnagrl Amity's Focus Member

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    I'll post pictures. :)

    And Golden, Ethiopian food kind of reminds me of Indian food - vaguely. Similar spices and ingredients. And while it smells good cooking here - in Ethiopia... it smelled so bad. I can't even describe it... they cook on little coal stoves, so you had the smell of the coal burning, the pungent spices, the animals, the people, the dirt, the diesel. It took a couple of days to get used to.
  7. golden

    golden Active Member

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    Yes, strong smells like curry is what came to mind. Do you use curry at all in E food prep?
  8. 3boysnagrl

    3boysnagrl Amity's Focus Member

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    a lot of onion, turmeric, garlic, fenugreenk, ginger, coriander, cardamom, cumin, etc. They use a spice blend called berebere which is a spicy hot roasted pepper seasoning with lots of other spices in it, too. Each family would have their own 'recipe', so no two are alike. Kind of like their injera. Some of the starters have been around forever... like a LONG time... and every woman is proud of HER injera, and wants you to try it. :heart smirk:
  9. herc

    herc Amity's Focus Member

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    curry just means a spice mixture :) I love both Indian and Ethiopian foods, and have gotten pretty decent at Indian foods, and have made a few Ethiopian things, but injera scares me and we have nowhere local to buy it from.
  10. golden

    golden Active Member

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    Yes, I know. I am just retrieving the scent file from my memory from 15 years ago when I had never eaten Indian or Ethiopian food. Now that I have had plenty of curry, it reminds of that.
  11. 3boysnagrl

    3boysnagrl Amity's Focus Member

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    If my injera doesn't turn out, I will just be ordering it online from now on. Ethiopian Spices makes it and sends it out on Tuesdays, so you can have it for the weekend. :) I did this in Hawaii. It was pretty good. Better than my attempts thus far, for sure. :lol:
  12. artemis33

    artemis33 Amity's Focus Member

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    I've been wanting to try an authentic sourdough injera for a long time, esp now that I am not close to the restaurants and the Ethiopian deli where you can buy injera, etc. I've got teff flour in my pantry now and some berebere from that deli. Just need my spices for the nitr kibeh (having trouble finding nigella locally).

    Decided recently to do it because I want to use up the red lentils in my pantry with this dish

    Ethiopian Lentil Stew - Saveur.com

    and since I am currently dairy and gluten free, I realized it is a good time to play around with injera!

    Thanks for the ideas for other dishes to pair with it! Hope everything turns out great!
  13. 3boysnagrl

    3boysnagrl Amity's Focus Member

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    Good luck!

    I didn't use nigella for my nitr kibeh. It used: butter, onion, garlic, ginger, turmeric, cardamom, cinnamon stick, clove and nutmeg.

    This is the site I am using for instructions for the injera. It isn't all teff - and there HAS to be a way to make a teff starter without making so much... this method has a lot of waste while the starter is 'brewing'. It also uses all purpose flour in the end mixing stage.

    I started my injera mix today! Tonight I will be doing the second step - and then it should be ready to cook first thing in the morning - as soon as I get up.

    I can't wait. I hope they like it. Gomen (greens) is my favorite and that was the biggest fail I had last week when I tried to make them. This time I am combining collards and spinach, which is what the local Ethiopian restaurant uses.

    I'm just using brown lentils for my lentil dish. Hope it turns out tasty.

    Oh, my spices arrived today. whew. I was hoping they would! I ordered from Spices and seasonings at Wholesale Prices - Shop My Spice Sage and they shipped super fast and the spices were all packaged in nice sturdy little resealable bags.
  14. 3boysnagrl

    3boysnagrl Amity's Focus Member

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    Oh, and thanks for that link! That looks more like what I wanted to make than the recipe I found for misr wat. This is what I was looking for. Thanks!!! The other one used tomato paste and chopped tomatoes.
  15. herc

    herc Amity's Focus Member

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  16. 3boysnagrl

    3boysnagrl Amity's Focus Member

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  17. Tap dancin mama

    Tap dancin mama Amity's Focus Member

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    Sounds yummy! I want to see pictures!
  18. 3boysnagrl

    3boysnagrl Amity's Focus Member

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    OK, so I got up this morning, and checked on my injera batter. Looks good! All bubbly! I hope it works.

    Timing is going to be everything. I need to chop 5 extremely large onions (they have been chilling to hopefully avoid too many tears), peel potatoes, chop cabbage/collards/spinach, skin chicken legs, soak chicken legs, peel hard boiled eggs, cut beef - all before I start cooking.

    And I need to get the injera cooked this morning, too. Before I start cooking the main dishes: 2 meats, 2 veggie dishes and 2 lentil/pea dishes.

    Mama needs some coffee.
  19. artemis33

    artemis33 Amity's Focus Member

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    Hope you are enjoying the fruits of your labor! :)
  20. momto3

    momto3 Amity's Focus Member

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    YUM!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I love Ethiopian food, especially the greens. I can't wait to hear how it all turned out! I would love to learn a few dishes.

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